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Mission

"By denying scientific principles, one may maintain any paradox." – Galileo Galilei

What They’re Saying

IARC Causes Confusion

Geoffrey Kabat, cancer epidemiologist at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the United States

“What the public wants to know is: What are the agents in our surroundings that are likely to have palpable effects on our health? Not theoretical exposures which might, under some far-fetched conditions, possibly have an effect.”

– Geoffrey Kabat, cancer epidemiologist at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the United States, Reuters, April 18, 2016

Charles Clift, global public health specialist at the Centre on Global Health Security at Britain’s Chatham House Reuters

“The WHO should be there to give authoritative guidance, not just endorse things that can be misinterpreted – either from IARC or anybody else.”

– Charles Clift, global public health specialist at the Centre on Global Health Security at Britain’s Chatham House Reuters, April 18, 2016

Jonathan D. Schoenfeld, MD, MPH, radiation oncologist at the Dana-Farber / Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center and Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology at Harvard Medical School John PA Ioannidis, professor in disease prevention in the school of medicine and professor of health research and policy at Stanford University. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

“Associations with cancer risk or benefits have been claimed for most food ingredients. Many single studies highlight implausibly large effects, even though evidence is weak. Effect sizes shrink in meta-analyses.”

– Jonathan D. Schoenfeld, MD, MPH, radiation oncologist at the Dana-Farber / Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center and Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology at Harvard Medical School &

– John PA Ioannidis, professor in disease prevention in the school of medicine and professor of health research and policy at Stanford University. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, October 5, 2012

Stanley Omaye, professor of nutrition and toxicology at the University of Nevada, Legal News Line

“You would have to drink probably over 100 cups of coffee a day in order to get to that dangerous dose, so it is totally absurd.”

– Stanley Omaye, professor of nutrition and toxicology at the University of Nevada, Legal News Line, July 8, 2016


IARC's Difficulties with Bias and Conflicts of Interest

Bob Tarone, Statistician formerly at America’s National Cancer Institute, now Biostatistics Director at International Epidemiology Institute

“It’s absurd to assert there are no issues of bias [within IARC] related to self-interest, reputation or careerism. It has nothing to do with bad motives, it’s just human nature.”

– Bob Tarone, Statistician formerly at America’s National Cancer Institute, now Biostatistics Director at International Epidemiology Institute, Reuters, April 18, 2016

Anders Ahlbom, a senior professor at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, was originally invited to chair the working group on electromagnetic radio frequencies in May, 2011

“It appears that IARC handles conflicts of interest differently depending on who the person is and which ‘side’ he is assumed to represent.”

– Anders Ahlbom, a senior professor at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, was originally invited to chair the working group on electromagnetic radio frequencies in May, 2011, Reuters, April 18, 2016

Betsy Booren, Ph.D., North American Meat Institute vice president of scientific affairs

“It was clear sitting in the IARC meeting that many of the panelists were aiming for a specific result despite old, weak, inconsistent, self-reported intake data. They tortured the data to ensure a specific outcome.”

– Betsy Booren, Ph.D., North American Meat Institute vice president of scientific affairs, Wall Street Journal, October 26, 2015


The Negative Impacts Of Media And Politics In Science

Geoffrey Kabat, cancer epidemiologist at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the United States

“There is a pretense that the public needs to know about studies, but often the results really are so uncertain that one has to question what use they are to anyone. So, I come down on the side of feeling that we need much higher standards for what gets published and to stop utilizing the public to boost the stature of our work.”

– Geoffrey Kabat, cancer epidemiologist at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the United States, Epimonitor Interview

“politicization of science is a serious danger….We need to continuously strive to distinguish good — that is, reproducible — science from politics and from policy.”

– Geoffrey Kabat, cancer epidemiologist at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the United States, Epimonitor Interview